COPD Clinical Trials

Subpopulations and Intermediate Outcome Measures in COPD ("SPIROMICS")

Purpose

Subpopulations and intermediate outcome measures in COPD study (SPIROMICS) is an observational (no drug) study that supports the prospective collection and analysis of phenotypic, biomarker, genetic, genomic, and clinical data from subjects with COPD for the purpose of identifying subpopulations and intermediate outcome measures. It is funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and is coordinated by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Detailed Description

Research subjects for SPIROMICS will be enrolled, phenotyped, and followed at six SPIROMICS Clinical Centers (in Winston-Salem, NC; Ann Arbor, MI; San Francisco, CA; Los Angeles, CA; New York City, NY; and Salt Lake City, UT). Molecular fingerprinting and extensive subject phenotyping will be performed to identify disease subpopulations and to identify and validate surrogate markers of disease severity, which will be useful as intermediate outcome measures for future clinical trials. Secondary aims are to clarify the natural history of COPD, to develop bioinformatic resources that will enable the utilization and sharing of data in studies of COPD and related diseases, and to create a collection of clinical, biomarker, radiographic, and genetic data that can be used by external investigators for other studies of COPD.

Please call 415-269-6370 for more information on the SPIROMICS study.

Characterization of Innate Immunity in COPD

Purpose

The goal of this study is to better understand how chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) affects the immune system's ability to fight infection in the lungs.

Detailed Description

COPD exacerbations ("flare-ups") are associated with accelerated disease progression and result in increased emergency-room visits and hospitalization. About half of COPD exacerbations are thought to be due to underlying microbial infections. In addition, patients with COPD exacerbation have increased susceptibility to secondary respiratory infections. Immune cells that line the airways are the first line of defense against microbial pathogens in the lungs. Over 90% of these immune cells are alveolar macrophages, specialized cells that are able to phagocytize ("devour") and kill microbial pathogens. Recent evidence suggests the phagocytic ability of alveolar macrophages in patients with COPD may be defective. To investigate this phenomenon, alveolar macrophages from healthy and COPD subjects are examined for their phagocytic ability and cytokine production profile. Macrophages are then screened against a protein library to identify potential therapeutic targets that could rescue this defect.

For more information about this study, please call 415-221-4810 x4009 or write to: [email protected].